Cruciverbalism

Cruciverbalism is an affectionate term us word nerds use to describe the science/art of crossword construction. When I am not coding, running stats, analyzing fruit juice chemistry, removing leaves from plants, or whatever else I might be doing, I might be solving or constructing crosswords. Some of my creations have even been published in some well-known outlets. For lack of a better term, here is my “Crosswording C.V.”

Bajcz, A. Daily crossword puzzle. The New York Times. [6 May 2014; 21 Apr. 2016; 1 accepted–date pending]. Will Shortz (Ed.).

Bajcz, A. “No Problemo!” 21 x 21 crossword puzzle. The Crosswords Club. No. 2095. Dec. 2013. Rich Norris (Ed.).

Bajcz, A. 21 x 21 crossword puzzle. The Crosswords Club. Accepted–date pending. Patti Varol (Ed.).

Bajcz, A. and J. Chen. “Mental Blocks.” 21 x 21 crossword puzzle. The Uptown Puzzle Club. No. 1260. Dec. 2013. Leslie Billig (Ed.).

Bajcz, A. Daily crossword puzzle. The Los Angeles Times. [1 Feb. 2013; 21 Mar. 2013]. Rich Norris (Ed.).

Bajcz, A. “Volumizing.” Sunday crossword puzzle. The Los Angeles Times. 10 Jul. 2016. Rich Norris (Ed.).

The New York Times puzzles are available from their website or from the wonderful website Xwordinfo, but either source requires a subscription. Puzzles that appear in the Los Angeles Times are available for free on their website, but there is not a database for past puzzles that is currently available (so far as I know) for the LAT. Puzzles published by the Crosswords Club are available only via subscription, and I do not know of a repository for these either. That said, PDFs of my past puzzles are available upon request as long as you promise not to distribute them widely.

Here are some links to some blog posts discussing some of the puzzles above:

If you want to take a crack at my past LAT puzzles, PDFs of those are available below. Please do not distribute them other than for your personal use. Thanks!